Monday 6th January, 2020

MEET THE ARTISTS 

We caught up with two of the guest artists joining us for National Music Camp 2020, starting this week. 

Natsuko Yoshimoto, Director

Adelaide Symphony Orchestra Concertmaster Natsuko Yoshimoto will lead the orchestra at AYO National Music Camp.

Where do you call home?

Currently Brisbane – we moved there early this year and we really enjoy living there as a family. I’m originally from Japan but lived away from there since I was 8. For a while England was where I felt the most at home, but now it’s Australia!

What would you say you're best known for?

By my children apparently “the best cook in the world”...

Go-to composers?

A hard question but probably Bach, Beethoven, Mozart and Brahms.

When you’re not listening to classical music,
what do you listen to?

I really enjoy not listening actually, there is so much ‘noise’ in the world that sometimes I crave peace and quiet! But I do love and enjoy jazz.

Are you most productive in the morning or the evening?

I’m most productive whenever I need and have to be.
I like the concept of doing some work in the morning when I’m fresh but mostly I have to leave it until late at night.

Tell us about a teacher who made a big impact
on your career.

I’m not sure about career, but certainly on my attitude to music from my violin teachers Yehudi Menuhin and Wen Zhou Li, and my chamber music teacher Peter Norris from my early days.

What is your favourite thing about being a violinist?

That I can produce sound and play and make music with people.

What are you most looking forward to about working with the Australian Youth Orchestra AYO next year?

Working intensively with the young and talented musicians with one communal goal towards making the best music!

 

William Barton, Didgeridoo 

Didgeridoo Virtuoso, William Barton will be joining the musicians as Artist-In-Residence at AYO National Music Camp. 

Where do you call home?

I grew up in Mount Isa in Far-North-Western Queensland and I’m from the Kalkadunga tribe. It’s based in a mining town, however there are a lot of culturally significant sites in relation to my people and my ancestors so I draw inspiration from there.

What would you say you're best known for?

I guess I’m known for my passion to develop the digeridoo into the repertoire of the classical world, and to use improvisation as a skilful tool to interact with musicians and make them part of the journey on stage.

When you’re not performing or practising, what do you like to listen to?

I have playlist with a mix of Shane Howard, Sting, Sneaky Sound System, Scorpions, Radiohead, The Presets, No Doubt, Guns N’ Roses, Daft Punk, Victor Wooten and INXS.

Tell us about a teacher who made a big impact on your career.

My Uncle Arthur Peterson as a digeridoo teacher is significant in my life for inspiring me and teaching me to carry on the story of our people of Australia, my tribe and my ancestors. My mother and father for teaching me manners and to be proud of my culture and identity. There’s always a teacher out there if you’re willing to look and listen.

Are you most productive in the morning or the evening?

It depends if I get enough sleep, that’s the main thing when I’m fresh and focused but I would say I’m a night person. I think you can actually burn the midnight flame though, it’s always good to get enough sleep.

What is your favourite thing about being a didgeridoo player?

To express myself on stage and give my audience the opportunity to experience this ancient instrument, these new sounds and discover the digeridoo is much more than just a sound one would hear on a tourism advertisement.

What are you most looking forward to about working with the AYO next year?

To help plant the seed for future generations of storytellers. Seeing musicians learning to immerse themselves in Australian culture and music, and to continue that legacy - I always look forward to being a part of that. 

   


Watch these artists and more  at AYO's upcoming National Music Camp Summer Concert Series